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multi-session

30 Days of Mörk Borg Adventure Chapbook vol. 2: On the Island of Dying Gods

“This book expands the one-page, one-shots taken from my digital offering 30 Days of MÖRK BORG and is the second volume in a planned series of ten. For this volume, we focused on creating three distinct modules within a larger keyed setting, but there’s still plenty of room for improvisation and substitution at your table.”

Abyss of Hallucinations

“Things are exactly what they seem, yet nothing seems to be what it is. What whimsy worms its way into the warped underpinnings of knowledge?”

Altars of Cursed Prince Olof

“Three altars were erected in dark places. Find them and make a blood offering to please Olof the undying prince.”

A Piece of Rotten Fish

“Two feuding and starving fishing hamlets. One tasty rotting carcass of a giant sea monster in between. The meat could feed both hamlets for a long time. Unfortunately, the hamlets are not in a sharing mood.”

Boarding the Ouroboros

Concept: “… word has come to you from an old fisherman with great promise. He says he has seen a hulk adrift far from the shore and wants a crew of brave souls to climb aboard and plunder its riches.”
Content:
A maritime salvage adventure full of mutiny and mystery
Writing:
Lots of atmospheric descriptive text along with well-written letters, stats for black powder and nautical weapons, and a whole slew of monsters
Art/design:
Nicely made maps; monochrome palette conveys the sensation of approaching and exploring the ship by night
Usability:
Rotblack Sludge-inspired layout is extremely efficient

Bone Heart Crusaders

“Heeding the call of Adalbert the Warhawk, a host assembled. Thousands of starving soldiers took up sword, flail, cross, and shield. Fight for life, fight to the death.”

Catacombs of the Briar Witch

Concept: “Annika and her son Torean – like so many others – caught the Ebon Pox early this winter. While she has slowly begun to recover, the child did not.”
Content:
A sprawling adventure to find a lost child with multiple locales to explore, NPCs to interact with, and a wide variety of monsters and adversaries
Writing:
Highly descriptive and replete with sample dialogue for NPCs
Art/design:
Establishes the settings and atmosphere without obstructing usability
Usability:
Well organized with additional material included in an appendix

Corpsewake Cove

Concept: “There is no nest of scurvy rats as foul or felonious as the pirates of Corpsewake Cove!”
Content:
A self-contained, sandbox-style swashbuckling adventure from inciting incident to bloody climax
Writing:
Text-heavy but clean, clear, and effective on all levels; includes lots of description as well as stat blocks, tables, and other mechanical components
Art/design:
Balances out the verbal elements with lots of vivid, nautically themed designs
Usability:
A fair amount of content and moving parts to manage, but nothing a seasoned and conscientious GM can’t handle

Curic’s Cursed Chapbook

“In the days of sunlight, before nightmares blackened the skies and the cursed people claimed the world, there was a traveler by the name of Lukas Curic who enjoyed sharing stories with those he met in the towns and villages of the world.”

Dead Girls in Sarkash Forest

Concept: “You are lost. You are dead.”
Content:
A random pointcrawl through Sarkash, 6 original thematic classes, and optional rules and gear that add more conceptual depth and distinction without straying from the Mörk Borg core
Writing:
Brooding and grim with an undertone of forlorn optimism; extremely effective in conveying the intended tone and atmosphere
Art/design:
Visually diverse art and typographical choices unified by a focus on the setting and themes
Usability:
Deliberately deals with sexism and trauma; intended as a self-contained module, but the adventure and classes can be used with other Mörk Borg content

Drafts: Dead Girl Classes, Dead Girls in Sarkash Forest, Encounters in Sarkash Forest

Den of Disarray

“A randomly generated dungeon for Mörk Borg that contains one of the biggest secrets of the dying world”

Dungeoneer's Black Book

Concept: “Welcome to the Dungeoneer's Black Book, a collection of boggy holes and haunted cellars. No evening shall pass without the gruesome, ultimately inevitable death of a beloved character.”
Content: 16 dungeons in a disturbing array of contents and formats
Writing: A variety of adventures await you with their own unique styles. The only guarantee is misery.
Art/design: A engrossing (sometimes gross) exploration of dungeon layout and illustration.
Usability: With a variety of design formats, make sure to read your selected dungeon before the session.

Emeric’s Pilgrimage

Concept: “Now cursed for all eternity, he moves a finger-length a year towards the Monastery of the Profane Cross. When he finishes his pilgrimage, the world will end.”
Content: A heroic hexcrawl in three dimensions with multiple options for resolution
Writing:
Alternatively supernatural, apocalyptic, and humorous; includes a brief overview of the scenario’s folkloric and real-world inspirations
Art/design:
Typographical choices and redundancy of clean, clear maps make for easy navigation
Usability:
Available in single-page, spread, and booklet formats

From Beyond the Endless Sea

Concept: “Cultists, Bloodhawks, secret island temples, wands channeling the Black Wind, loopy hippies, gnarly artifacts, zombified townsfolk, and the ability to loot your bosses' house - and much more - await you.”
Content: A frenzied mob is overtaking Grift, do something about it.
Writing: Deified mob violence unifies multiple sessions in Grift and provides a potential antagonist for long-term play.
Art/design: Design elements convey the compulsions of a waking god. Consistent use of public domain image backdrops.
Usability: Thoughtful design elements on a large-scale aid in utility and navigation. 

Galgenbeck Sacrifice

“Half of Galgenbeck's population is gone. Most have fallen to Josilfa's scythe. The city seems eerily empty, but nobody notices the citizens' absence. Galgenbeck was always half empty. All is as it should be.”
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